a stroll to Pedralbes

possibly the most sought after place to have a dwelling in Barcelona is crowned on its upper end by a cloister and even something close to silence is possible here.

heute Venedig

Zwei Männer um die 50 joggen am Sonntag um zehn Uhr durch die schmalen Straßen und über die Brücken Venedigs. Es gibt etwa vierhundert von ihnen, versehen mit Treppenstufen, die nur die halbe Höhe haben. Träger überqueren sie sanft mithilfe kleiner Zusatzrädchen an ihren Karren, die etwa einen halben Meter vor den Rädern montiert sind. Ware wird so durch die Stadt transportiert. Müll auch. Wer hier lebt, muss anders leben als jeder, der woanders lebt: Ein Auto braucht man nicht. Ein Großeinkauf geht nicht. Das Fahrradfahren ist verboten.

Piazza San Marco, Venice

dusk in the center of power of the world

now silent, they were busy halls, where the fate of the world was once decided. Where the defence of Constantinople was fatally delayed. Passages and narrow stairways designed the flow of people, whose fate was too here by the devices of justice decided and with a last sight were walked across the bridge to barred windows.

Night people

long nights. Awaiting.

Memory of the Eggartenhäuser

Memory of the lost Eggartenhäuser

soon to be gone for good, the Eggartenhäuser grew over the years unnoticed by most. A new residential development will soon hause 2000 souls in this forgotten patch of Munich.

Alvi Photo-shooting Summer

Alvi

a photo-shooting in the city

grey morning over the park

the park and the bruises

not unharmed wakes up the park on Sunday morning, his bruises exposed by the morning grey light under a clouded sky.

Neuaubing

the old tracks and the resettlement

wagons once threaded this plain and filled the night with echos of metallic giggle, where now nature and new settlers walk around still puzzled how to classify what they see in their Saturday’s afternoon walk. Here and there, if you stop long enough to see through the signs, you can see the ghosts of those railroad tracks and ties under thickening vegetation. The sudden idle beds of track ballast stand questioning their purpose now like dry wounds in the meadows.

Hidden in the woods, old tracks, fallen lampposts, gates with nothing to gate, lost ponds. And an old adjoining settlement. Despite the looks, no vignetting is applied to the photographies.

The old bed wagons factory witness yet one other kind of resettlement: partly spooky, partly trashy, and certainly worth walking through.

two days in Valencia

Along the streets of Valencia you can see the legacy of many architectonic styles from the gothic, renaissance, baroque, neoclassic, modernist, to bauhaus, constructivism, brutalism, and… well some things by Calatrava too.

The city seems big but not too big, modern but not too modern, opulent but not too opulent, burgeois but not too burgeois. It has it all but nothing becomes invasive. It may be that it is January, but Valencia still seems to belong to its citizens and not to the tourists. And I long with melancholy for this to stay this way, despite being an impossible act of balance in a world of seismic schockwaves of tourism.

The defensive Torres de Quart in the west-end of the old city of Valencia were made for one clear purpose. Being there you cannot help but imagine soldiers loaded with bows and quills hurrying upstairs, dropping boiling oil through the outlet above the doors, atop the towers scouting the horizon with squinted eyes under the sun of the afternoon.

The building of the Lonja de Valencia feels at the end game of commercial opulence but still displaying its former functionality: the polished by use floor tiles, twisted solomonic columns, gothic arches. A photographic feast indeed.

Tarragona and a look back

here I look back almost 50 years at the same streets, houses and windows of Tarragona were I grew up. The little park-inside-a-roundabout. Everything looks changed but not changed and certainly tiny now. The same aluminum late-60’s windowframes with possibly the same thin surviving windowpanes I looked out at the world. The same narrow walkways and small storefronts, but now mostly shut; They look like little cave entrances compared to the grandeur of nowadays’ retail-chain halls somewhere else.

The old harbour, once a row of small fishermen houses with workshops where wives tended to the blue nyon fishnets and boats docked just before the horn blew the end of the fishing day at 5 PM, is now a strolling alley decorated with fountains. Fishnets gave room to icecream and coffee shops. My uncle used to be one of about 50 fishermen captains. He had his own boat and a crew of 7. Now five boats with a crew of 2 are allowed to operate from a little corner of the harbour. Yet the same moon rise over Tarragona, come night.